Personal, Portable, Pedestrian Mobile Phones in Japan

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Personal, Portable, Pedestrian Mobile Phones in Japan

Postby Stevyn » Sat Jan 02, 2010 3:44 pm

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/de ... 10&ttype=2

Personal, Portable, Pedestrian
Mobile Phones in Japanese Life
Edited by Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe and Misa Matsuda

Table of Contents and Sample Chapters

The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become—along with anime, manga, and sushi—part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.

The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life.

About the Editors

Mizuko Ito is Research Scientist at the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Daisuke Okabe is Lecturer at the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Shonan Fujisawa Campus, Japan.

Misa Matsuda is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Chuo University, Tokyo.
Contact me directly: Ironfeatherbooks (@) gmail.com

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